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Author Topic: Major Dunkley, 10th ALHR  (Read 3194 times)
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« on: 15 September 2011, 07:29:22 pm »

Bill Woerlee
Veteran Forum Member
 

Australia
1036 Posts   Posted - 23/11/2004 :  6:53:48 PM    
Phil
Since you are the resident sage on all things related to the 10th ALHR, I am wondering if you have heard of an elusive Major Dunkley who took part in the Es Salt raid. The specific incident I am looking at occurred on 30 April 1918 on the Jisr ed Damieh – Es Salt Road near Kefr Huda. In this action, a Squadron from the 10th ALHR assisted in a joint action along with all available riflemen from the 9th ALHR, 3rd MG Squadron, and the Hong Kong and Singapore Battery. The action took place at 1430 [when Major Dunkley arrived] until the rounding up of 200 prisoners at 1945.

Here is the incident from the 9th ALHR War Diary:

"At 1430, Dunkley, Major and his Squadron from the 10th Light Horse Regiment and two troops of C Squadron, 9th Light Horse Regiment moved to our right flank and drove the enemy off the position and occupied it. B Squadron continued to hold the ridge in Square 127 H29c. One subsection of 3rd machine Gun Squadron was attached to B Squadron and two more guns were brought into action on the left flank of B Squadron. B Squadron and 3rd Machine Gun Squadron section at about 600 yards range brought a heavy fire to bear onto the enemy position. At about 1500, two guns of the Hong Kong and Singapore Battery came up and opened fire. At 1600 orders received that all available men of the 9th Light Horse Regiment would assist two Squadrons of the 10th Light horse Regiment in a dismounted attack at 1730 on enemy main position 600 yards in advance of B Squadron. At 1715 the attacking troops formed up in the rear of B Squadron line in three lines, 10th Light Horse Regiment on the right and 9th Light Horse Regiment [numbering four Officers and 72 Other Ranks] formed up on the left flank of each line. 1730 heavy covering fire from all machine guns, Hong Kong and Singapore Battery, B Squadron and position of A and C Squadron under Bleechmore, Major C, was brought to bear onto enemy position and attack was down a steep rocky slope and up a similar slope. Conformation of the ground thus presenting an unusually favourable opportunity for covering fire allowing our men to get within 15 to 20 yards of the enemy line before it ceased. Our men advanced with great deliberation and confidence carrying out the final charge with great dash and enthusiasm. The left flank of the enemy position was occupied by the 10th Light Horse Regiment and shortly afterwards the enemy right flank was occupied by the 9th Light Horse Regiment. As soon as the attack was observed to succeed, the 8th Light Horse Regiment who were waiting in readiness on the road in the rear of B Squadron position moved forward and captured Es Salt taking about 200 prisoners and much war material."

I am just wondering who this Major Dunkley is - I looked on the Nominal Roll and there were two Dunleys who were officers and none in the 10th ALHR. I am not even sure if this is the right name bearing in mind the problems that I had with AWearn and Ahearn in a previous topic. I am not sure as to the answer but hopefully you have one for me.

Thanks in anticipation.

Cheers

Bill

Bill Woerlee
Veteran Forum Member
 

Australia
1036 Posts    Posted - 23/11/2004 :  7:09:36 PM    
Phil
I answered my own question. Dunkley is Timperly. Took a bit to get there but question answered.

Cheers

Bill

philmaur
Advanced Forum Member
 

Australia
241 Posts    Posted - 25/11/2004 :  10:16:08 PM  
Bill, I have been very busy driving at nights, so I haven't had a look at my records on the action part, but I have two photos with the mentioned Dunckley in them.He is listed as Capt.C.G.Dunckley.He was a Lieut.in the 6th. Reinforcements in the 10th's. history. Phil.


Andrew P
Forum Member


Australia
154 Posts    Posted - 26/11/2004 :  3:01:00 PM  
Bill
If you were not aware of it already the AWM has some personal accounts of Major Timperley in their collection.

Regards
Andrew

stevebecker
Veteran Forum Member
 


1840 Posts    Posted - 26/11/2004 :  5:52:31 PM  
Bill,
Now that I have one of my data bases up and running I can answer this from my records of which feel free to correct if I am wrong.

My records show Maj Timperley commanded C Sqn 10 LHR, while I am sure who commanded B Sqn at that time was Maj Hamlin. There was Maj Dunckley as mentioned commanded A Sqn 10 LHR. See page 228 10 LHR History mentions all three officers during the action.

Maj Hamlin later died of a heart attack.

S.B

Bill Woerlee
Veteran Forum Member
 

Australia
1036 Posts    Posted - 29/11/2004 :  10:08:02 PM    
Steve
Sorry not to get back to you on this one quickly but my attention has been a tad bit diverted. Thanks for the information. It is a great help to me.

Cheers cobber.

Bill

Bill Woerlee
Veteran Forum Member
 

Australia
1036 Posts    Posted - 29/11/2004 :  10:10:35 PM    
Phil
Thanks for your kind response. You are a real hero as far as I am concerned. The information was top notch.

Cheers mate.

Bill

Bill Woerlee
Veteran Forum Member
 

Australia
1036 Posts    Posted - 29/11/2004 :  10:19:21 PM    
Andrew
Regarding that Timperley information, could you give the AWM references - I have searched the site and cannot even get a hit.

Thanks mate.

Cheers

stevebecker
Veteran Forum Member
 


1840 Posts    Posted - 30/11/2004 :  08:58:07 AM  
Mate,
The only thing I can think off off hand is the offical history, it has a number of references in Vol VII to him.

S.B

Bill Woerlee
Veteran Forum Member
 

Australia
1036 Posts    Posted - 30/11/2004 :  12:48:01 PM    
Steve
G'day mate.

Yeah, Gullett is the only source that I have been able to get a hold of in this circumstance. In the context of my research, it offers nothing more to me.

Cheers

Bill

Andrew P
Forum Member


Australia
154 Posts    Posted - 30/11/2004 :  2:56:26 PM  
Bill
I have a copy of it at home. The reference number for Mjr LC Timperley is 3DRL/6294.

When I was at the AWM earlier this year I also recall seeing quite a few photos of Timperley on the database.

He seems an interesting character. I believe he was with Mjr Olden when the 10th took the surrender of Damascus

Cheers
Andrew

Bill Woerlee
Veteran Forum Member
 

Australia
1036 Posts    Posted - 30/11/2004 :  5:32:49 PM    
Andrew
G'day and thanks for the reference. I shall use it well.

In terms of your comment regarding the surrender of Damascus, I have placed below the copy of a report sent by Wilson to Hodgeson regarding the taking of Damascus. The political context drips from this report bearing in mind the conflict between the Sheriffian forces and Chauvel. Wilson considered the Hejaz Arabs as nothing more than opportunistic thieves. On more than one occasion he utilised a show of arms to get his own way over things, especially supplies to his men and the POW's. Colonel Todd was his right hand man in this process. While Wison endorsed everything Todd did, Wilson never questioned him too closely on how he managed to do what he did in such a short time frame. But that is another story.

In the folowing story, Wilson is making it perfectly clear that his troops took the surrender of Damascus and while doing so, no Lawrence of Arabia with his flowing robes and thousands of swarthy Arabs nor any impression of their incumbency was seen. This is a major political point. The British hoped to avoid handing Syria over to the French - whose presence was made very clear with the cavalry regiment that formed part of the Bouchier force - as they swore to do so under the Sykes Picot agreement. They could prevaricate if the Arabs had liberated the city. Hence the movement of the 3rd ALHB was played down for political reasons.

Wilson later on dismissed the politics of the situation with this rather scathing comment in 1919: "The 3rd Australian Light Horse Brigade were thus the first Allied troops to enter Damascus. I understand that it appeared in the press that the Sherifian forces were the first to enter. This is not so. His force had been moving up from Deraa with the 4th Cavalry Division, Colonel Lawrence of the Sherifian Army with an escort pushed on to Damascus on the morning of 1st October and were seen to enter the city a few minutes before 0800, the absence of any British Troops may have given rise in the minds of the Sherifians to the erroneous belief that they were the first to enter the city. Up to the time(about 0700)that this Brigade completed its passage through the city thereby closing the only available exit for the enemy, no member of the Sheriff’s army was visible in any part of the city within view of the Brigade."

This report makes a clear point to the British High Command and Lloyd George that while they are playing high politics in London, good men are dying in Damascus.

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